The health care promises we cannot keep

It was a promise Matt Perrin wasn’t able to keep. “I’ll never take away your independence,” he’d told his mother, Rosemary, then 71, who lived alone on Cape Cod, Mass., in a much-loved cottage. That was before Rosemary started calling Perrin and his brother, confused and disoriented, when she was out driving. Her Alzheimer’s disease was progressing. Worried about the […]

Continue reading »

Hepatitis C-positive donors a viable option to expand heart donor pool

Patients who were transplanted with hearts from hepatitis C-positive donors had comparable outcomes after one year to patients who received hearts from donors that didn’t have the disease, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published in JAMA Cardiology. Using such hearts, which would have been largely discarded a few years ago before direct-acting antiviral therapies were proven effective, […]

Continue reading »

Africa’s genetic material is still being misused

Biodiversity—the variation in all living organisms—is one of Africa’s richest assets. As a result, its genetic material is coveted by scientists, biotechnology companies and research institutes globally. For decades, there has been a flow of data and biosamples from the African continent to the global north. This has often been in the absence of legitimate participant consent, community engagement or […]

Continue reading »

Researchers discover the origin and evolution of a famous concept of the brain

Eye-opening research by neurosurgeons from Barrow Neurological Institute and Montreal Neurological Institute has produced the foremost investigation of the origin and evolution of perhaps the most famous concept devised in neurobiology—the homunculus of neurosurgeon Wilder Penfield. The paper, along with a perspective piece, was published in the August issue of World Neurosurgery. The research was conducted by Drs. Mark Preul […]

Continue reading »

She never smoked—and got lung cancer in her 40s

(HealthDay)—Nikki Moreno had spent nearly a year struggling for breath, and nothing seemed to help. Not the inhalers, not the antibiotics and other drugs. Nothing seemed to help her breathe, and nothing got rid of her constant cough. It finally got so bad that she landed in the emergency room at UCLA Medical Center in Santa Monica. Moreno was not […]

Continue reading »

Nilotinib appears safe in Parkinson’s trial; drug thought to allow dopamine replenishment

A clinical trial investigating the repurposed cancer drug nilotinib in people with Parkinson’s disease finds that it is reasonably safe and well tolerated. Researchers also report finding an increase in dopamine, the chemical lost as a result of neuronal destruction, and a decrease in neurotoxic proteins in the brain among study participants. Finally, they say nilotinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, […]

Continue reading »

The view from inside the ‘medical scandal’ of China’s gene-edited babies

Before the news broke internationally that Chinese scientist He Jiankui had allegedly genetically engineered twin girls, only a few people around the world had known about it. One of those was Penn cardiologist Kiran Musunuru. Musunuru had previously advised Associated Press journalist Marilynn Marchione on stories related to gene editing. So, when Marchione needed a trusted scientist to help her […]

Continue reading »

Does the brain trick you into thinking food tastes better on Thanksgiving? It’s complicated.

Turkey that’s often bland and accompanied with cranberry sauce from a can? Stuffing yourself with food until you’re set to burst? Those are two of the most common hallmarks of Thanksgiving, which most Americans around the country looking forward to with gusto each year, but have you ever wondered why? The food at Thanksgiving helps drive the enthusiasm for the […]

Continue reading »
1 136 137 138 139 140