Innate versus Adaptive Immunity in COVID-19

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected hundreds of millions of people over the world, with more than 4.5 million deaths. The most striking part of the outbreak is the fact that a majority of those infected show mild or no symptoms, while a significant minority develop severe or critical disease. Several studies have explored the immunological responses to […]

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Anthropogenesis and COVID-19

The emergence of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS–COV-2) virus in Wuhan, China, in 2019 and the subsequent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has been linked to the anthropogenic biodiversity crisis and climate change. History of COVID-19. The disturbance or destruction of the natural environment through human activity has resulted in a loss of biodiversity. Consequent to these […]

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Podcast: Boosters? Vaccines for kids? Where do we stand heading toward winter?

A new episode of our podcast, “Show Me the Science,” has been posted. At present, these podcast episodes are highlighting research and patient care on the Washington University Medical Campus as our scientists and clinicians confront the COVID-19 pandemic. Recently, the federal government decided that vaccine booster shots will be made available for Americans 65 and older, those with compromised […]

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AAM – Air pollution and Alzheimer's

Air pollution is an established environmental hazard. It is known to be linked to both respiratory disease and that of the heart and vascular system. However, recently its association with Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been suspected and explored in many studies. Image Credit: Melinda Nagy/Shutterstock.com There are six primary types of air pollutants, including ozone (O3), particulate matter (PM), carbon […]

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How do Microplastics Affect Our Health?

The use of plastic is one of the conveniences of modern life, but in recent years microplastic contamination has become an emerging global concern. Microplastics ––plastic particles measuring less than 5mm ––are everywhere ––from the deepest oceans to the air we breathe. Their small size and mass mean they are readily transported by wind and microplastics have been found in […]

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I found out a few months ago, my mom died of leukemia cancer, I felt horrible about it, I cried a lot, I have been feeling quiet and kinda sad lately, what can I do?

Thank you so much for reaching out about this. We are so sorry to hear about your loss. It sounds like you are worried about the feelings you are having around the loss of your mom. Losses can be incredibly hard and it is normal and natural for anyone to experience the feelings you are having. Grief is how we […]

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$7 million to support research into how human genome works

Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has received a $7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to help lead national efforts to investigate how variations in the human genome sequence affect how the genome functions. Such information is critical for understanding human health and seeking new ways to treat diseases. The university will serve as […]

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The microbiome of a newborn

The human microbiome is a microbial community defined as the total of all microbes living in or on the human body. It affects the nutrition of the body, its metabolism, and its immunological responses. Adaptive and innate immune factors influence the microbiome and dietary patterns, medication, and toxins. Human illnesses also change the microbiome profile. Image Credit: Design_Cells/Shutterstock.com Gut microbiome […]

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Podcast: Vaccines and COVID-19 infection generate protective antibodies, even against delta

A new episode of our podcast, “Show Me the Science,” has been posted. At present, these podcast episodes are highlighting research and patient care on the Washington University Medical Campus as our scientists and clinicians confront the COVID-19 pandemic. It’s been a busy summer in the laboratory of Ali Ellebedy, PhD, an associate professor of pathology & immunology and of […]

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