What is Asherson’s Syndrome?

Asherson’s syndrome, also known as catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS), is an extremely rare autoimmune condition. It is defined by the fast progression of blood clots impacting many organ systems of the body over hours, days, or weeks. Infections, vaccinations, wounds caused by physical trauma, and failure of the body's anticoagulation mechanism are all examples of "triggers." Patients with antiphospholipid syndrome […]

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How is the ‘omics’ Revolution Changing Healthcare?

The term “omics” refers to a pool of technologies that are used to measure and functionally characterize different biomolecules in cells or tissues. The primary aim of “omics” technologies is to study genes (genomics), RNAs (transcriptomics), proteins (proteomics), and metabolites (metabolomics). Image Credit: Love Employee/Shutterstock.com What is genomics? Genomics is the study of the whole genome (the complete set of […]

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How is a Face Transplant Performed?

What is a face transplant? A face transplant is a medical operation that involves the replacement of all or specific parts of the face using the facial tissue of another person (donor). A portion of the area called Vascularized Composite Tissue Allotransplantation (VCA) includes transplants of the skin of the face, the structure of the nose, lips, facial muscles used […]

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What is Ameloblastoma?

Ameloblastoma, a rare human disease, is a benign tumor originating in the odontogenic epithelium. It is commonly found in the jaw bone. The tumor develops from the tooth germ's epithelium, odontogenic cyst epithelium, stratified squamous epithelium, and enamel organ epithelium. Ameloblastoma is the most frequent odontogenic tumor of epithelial origin with significant clinical implications, despite being categorized as a benign […]

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Prenatal, early-life influences on child brain development focus of new study

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are joining scientists at 24 other sites around the country to conduct a comprehensive study aimed at understanding how prenatal factors and early life experiences influence brain development and behavior in infants and young children. With more than $37 million in funding from several institutes and centers at the National […]

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NIH awards 4 medical school scientists prestigious ‘high-risk, high-reward’ grants

Four scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have been awarded prestigious grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) aimed at supporting the researchers’ innovative and impactful biomedical and behavioral research. The grants are among a total of 106 such grants awarded to scientists recognized via the NIH Common Fund’s High-Risk, High-Reward Research program. The program […]

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What Role does Endothelial Infection Play in SARS-CoV-2 Infection?

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) can cause inflammatory lung disease, including clot formation and hyper-permeability of the lung vessels, resulting in edema and bleeding into the lung. Inflammation also affects other organs, mediated by the cytokine storm. This inflammation is characterized by endothelial cell dysfunction in multiple organs. The cause of this endothelialopathy is unknown. It could […]

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Emotional aspects of chronic pain isolated in brain circuitry

Negative emotional states and physical pain are intimately connected. Numerous people who suffer from chronic, persistent pain also deal with negative emotions and loss of motivation. Some even become clinically depressed eventually, and doctors sometimes prescribe antidepressants to treat chronic pain, even though the pathways that link pain and mood are poorly understood. Now, studying the brains and behavior of […]

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