Bolstered mother-child bonds at heart of research

Known as ‘the thief that steals motherhood,” postpartum depression (PPD) not only obstructs a mother’s capacity for understanding and enjoying her baby, but puts children at risk for behavioral and cognitive problems. While treating PPD itself doesn’t always end up benefiting the mother/child relationship, Nursing professor Panagiota Tryphonopoulos is looking at ways to bolster this critical bond. “Everybody experiences parenting […]

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Incidence of early-onset gastric cancer increasing in the U.S.

(HealthDay)—The incidence of early-onset gastric cancer has been increasing in the United States, and it seems to be distinct clinically and genetically from late-onset gastric cancer, according to a study recently published in Surgery. John R. Bergquist, M.D., from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and colleagues examined clinical and genomic characteristics and risk factors for early-onset versus late-onset gastric […]

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Mindfulness video game changes areas of the brain associated with attention

With an estimated 97 percent of adolescents playing video games in their free time, there is growing potential to design games as tools for attention-building instead of attention-busting. A research team at the Center for Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and the University of California, Irvine, designed a video game to improve mindfulness in middle schoolers and found […]

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COPD death rates are falling in many countries but the total number of deaths is increasing

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) death rates fell in most countries between 1995 and 2017, but the total number of COPD deaths increased in many countries over the past 20 years, according to a new international analysis of World Health Organization (WHO) data. The study is published today (20 November 2019) in the European Respiratory Journal to coincide with World […]

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The health care promises we cannot keep

It was a promise Matt Perrin wasn’t able to keep. “I’ll never take away your independence,” he’d told his mother, Rosemary, then 71, who lived alone on Cape Cod, Mass., in a much-loved cottage. That was before Rosemary started calling Perrin and his brother, confused and disoriented, when she was out driving. Her Alzheimer’s disease was progressing. Worried about the […]

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Hepatitis C-positive donors a viable option to expand heart donor pool

Patients who were transplanted with hearts from hepatitis C-positive donors had comparable outcomes after one year to patients who received hearts from donors that didn’t have the disease, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published in JAMA Cardiology. Using such hearts, which would have been largely discarded a few years ago before direct-acting antiviral therapies were proven effective, […]

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Africa’s genetic material is still being misused

Biodiversity—the variation in all living organisms—is one of Africa’s richest assets. As a result, its genetic material is coveted by scientists, biotechnology companies and research institutes globally. For decades, there has been a flow of data and biosamples from the African continent to the global north. This has often been in the absence of legitimate participant consent, community engagement or […]

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Researchers discover the origin and evolution of a famous concept of the brain

Eye-opening research by neurosurgeons from Barrow Neurological Institute and Montreal Neurological Institute has produced the foremost investigation of the origin and evolution of perhaps the most famous concept devised in neurobiology—the homunculus of neurosurgeon Wilder Penfield. The paper, along with a perspective piece, was published in the August issue of World Neurosurgery. The research was conducted by Drs. Mark Preul […]

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